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Villains, the gift that keeps on giving

Greetings and salutations, Nerdarchy readers!

villains
Jim Carrey as Count Olaf in the 2004 film, Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events.”(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I was watching a show on Netflix while I was deathly ill (or so it felt to me) and could not help but be inspired to write on a subject I seem to be gathering a reputation for. Namely, villains who inspire the protagonist to excel into feats of legend. You see, like the villainous Count Olaf, a good villain will be a thorn in the protagonist’s side for a long time and alter their lives on every level. The thing is, in gaming it is too easy to create a villain who is a one trick pony or is killed in a single fight. For this reason, I am going to list a few things to keep in mind and a few things to avoid all together. Let’s dive right in, shall we? Continue reading Villains, the gift that keeps on giving

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In gaming as in literature, the villains make the heroes

snidley
Can you name this villain? Here’s a hint: He’s a certain Canadian mounty’s worst nightmare.

What is a hero without a villain? Not much, I’d say. Oh, a character can still be the main actor of a tale, the protagonist of a story, but without that villain, the hero can’t really be heroic.

Some might argue there are tales of heroes without a villain, such as survival stories in which the hero bests the elements to save the day, or maybe a romantic tale in which there is only a misunderstanding between love interests though eventually one or both of them proves their heroism by overcoming that misunderstanding. To that I say the villain is still there, but is not so readily seen. In the survival story, the elements themselves can be the villain. In the love story, if there is not an out-and-out villain, the misunderstanding that brings about conflict can be the villain. Sometimes the villain is the hero’s own inner struggle. Continue reading In gaming as in literature, the villains make the heroes

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Creating A NPC Villain For D&D 5E| Game Master Tips

Many a Game Master spend months thinking of these grand worlds and epic wars that shape the campaign arc with which they are going to start their story.

Battle_of_Towton_by_John_Quartley Creating A NPC Villain For D&D 5E| Game Master Tips

Others go back and forth between using some cataclysmic event or an ancient evil for the backdrop that affects the people and their lives.

elder_god_by_darkmessiah999 Creating A NPC Villain For D&D 5E| Game Master Tips

I just roll dice… :-p

No. Seriously, I started an entire section of Nerdarchy’s campaign setting, Chimes of Discordia, by randomly rolling an NPC Villain and consulting the charts found in the D&D 5e Dungeon Master’s Guide.

Not everyone is obsessed enough with being a game master as to have read all of the sections in the D&D 5e DMG. And that is okay.

For you I say. “check out the section on creating a NPC villain”, it is an easy way to start the super computer between your ears thinking creatively about antagonists and story arcs for your game. Continue reading Creating A NPC Villain For D&D 5E| Game Master Tips

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Statblock Tango: Creating Villains The Players Love To Hate.

Villain

“He had it coming
He had it coming
He only had himself to blame

If you’d have been there
If you’d have seen it
I betcha you would
Have done the same!”
-“Cellblock Tango” from Chicago a musical by John Kander, lyrics by Fred Ebb and a book by Ebb and Bob Fosse. Continue reading Statblock Tango: Creating Villains The Players Love To Hate.