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Theatrical Roleplaying in Modern RPGs

Beowulf graphic novel, translated by Santiago Garcia and art by David Rubin

In the past, I’ve talked a lot from my perspective as a writer, and from what I’ve learned from my college education in literary theory and rhetorical criticism as an English major. There are other aspects of my life, though, that I haven’t really touched on much.

In my article about utilizing critical success and failures, I mentioned some tenants of improv, which I’m tangentially familiar with from my 15 years of acting on stage. While it was mostly school and community theater work, and I haven’t been on stage in 15 years (although, lately I’ve been thinking of trying to break back in), it’s not a thing that ever leaves you.

However, I didn’t come here to talk about my past exploits.

I started out laying out an overview of my credentials because I want it to be clear what I have to say comes from a place of experience, even if those experiences were a lifetime ago. That’s because today I wanted to talk about approaching roleplaying your characters, whether you’re a Game Master or a player, from the perspective of an actor. Continue reading Theatrical Roleplaying in Modern RPGs

Joshua is bad about talking about himself, but won't shut up about anything else. A nerd since birth, he's experienced a lot of the culture. A gamer by nature, a writer, an actor, a film lover, an English major, and a recent discoverer of Dungeons and Dragons. Currently, he lives in Oregon, where his primary focus is to write novels, hopefully get a comic book series published, and maybe try his hand at making a very entry-level tabletop RPG game. He's always had idiotically lofty goals.
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Slavery in RPG Campaigns: Making a Case for Inclusion

Slavery.

slavery
A master leading his slave. [“Iron Ring Slaves” art by Jason Engle]
I want to let that hang there for a minute, because this is going to be a pretty serious topic. I want everyone to know this is going to be held with extreme gravity.

Slavery is a thing that’s been a problem throughout human history as much as it is exists in modern a fantasy tabletop RPG campaign like D&D.

It’s not necessarily everywhere, but it’s in there. Slavery is a subject included in these entries in the fifth edition Dungeons & Dragons Monster Manual: on page 5 (under towns and cities), and described in the aboleth, azer (the efreeti attempted to enslave them), beholders, bugbears, devils, red dragons, driders, duergar, drow, fomorian, genies, fire giants, gith, grimlock, hags, hobgoblins, jackalweres, kuo-toa, lamia, mind flayers, mummies, salamanders, yuan-ti, and even the commoner.

It’s in there. Continue reading Slavery in RPG Campaigns: Making a Case for Inclusion

Joshua is bad about talking about himself, but won't shut up about anything else. A nerd since birth, he's experienced a lot of the culture. A gamer by nature, a writer, an actor, a film lover, an English major, and a recent discoverer of Dungeons and Dragons. Currently, he lives in Oregon, where his primary focus is to write novels, hopefully get a comic book series published, and maybe try his hand at making a very entry-level tabletop RPG game. He's always had idiotically lofty goals.
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RPG Trickster Character NPCs: When and Where to Use Them

NPC trickster
John de Lancie portrayed Q in several episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Salutations, nerds.

I’m willing to bet, at one point or another, a lot of you have come into contact with a roleplaying game nonplayer character who played a little bit like Q from Star Trek.

The trickster NPC sweeps into your RPG, snaps their fingers, causes a boatload of trouble for the player characters and there isn’t anything you can do about it.

If it happened with a good Game Master, you were probably able to kick their butt afterward, but most of the time that isn’t the case and the only person who has fun is the GM sitting behind the screen going “haha look how frustrated you guys are.”

Yeah, it pretty much sucks. Except for when it doesn’t. Continue reading RPG Trickster Character NPCs: When and Where to Use Them

Speculative fiction writer and part-time Dungeon Master Megan R. Miller lives in southern Ohio where she keeps mostly nocturnal hours and enjoys life’s quiet moments. She has a deep love for occult things, antiques, herbalism, big floppy hats and the wonders of the small world (such as insects and arachnids), and she is happy to be owned by a black cat. Her fiction, such as The Chronicles of Drasule and the Nimbus Mysteries, can be found on Amazon.
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E69 YR1- D&D 5E Ranger Our 1st LOOK Podcast

podcast

podcast

Episode 69 of Nerdarchy the Podcast Year One

In this episode we go back to the first time we looked at the 5th edition Dungeons and Dragons ranger. We examine the two archetypes. They will be later remained conclaves and a revised ranger will appear featuring an all new beast master.

Ranger surviving the wilds of D&D 5E| Dungeons and Dragons 5th Edition Classes

5th Edition Dungeons and Dragons Classes Ranger surviving the wilds of D&D 5E

Nerdarchy delves into 5th Edition Dungeons and Dragons with the ranger. We also compare rangers throughout the editions of dungeons and dragons.

We universally enjoy the ranger in D&D 5e with only a couple glaring spots we don’t. House rules to the rescue. Let us know what you think about the ranger in the newest edition of D&D.

 

My name is Dave Friant I've been gaming off and on for over 27 years. But here is the thing it's always been a part of my life I've kept secret and hidden away. I've always been ashamed of the stigma that gaming and my other nerdy and geeky pursuits summon forth. Recently I decided screw it! This is who I am the world be damned. From now on I'm gonna be a geek, nerd, or however folks want to judge me and just enjoy life. Currently one of my greatest joys is introducing my 13 yr old son to table top RPG's.